Growing Guide

  1. Remove wrapping and all packaging from the rose.
    Place roots in a bucket of water.
    Approximately 15-30 minutes.
  2. Dig a hole approximately 25cm (10") deep by 30cm (12") wide.
  3. Loosen and extra 10-15 (4"-6") of soil in the bottom of the hole and mix in one or two handfuls of slow release fertiliser.
  4. Place rose in the hole spreading roots over and around a mound. (Adjust mound if necessary to raise the soil graft above the soil level).
  5. Keeping graft above soil level fill in the soil levelling a shallow moat-like depression around the rose. Soak thoroughly.
  6. Prune back branches to about 1/2cm (1/4") above the second bud above graft (approximately 10-15cm 4"-6").
  7. Single or multi – stemmed roses will produce equally well if pruned hard at planting time.
  8. Thoroughly water twice weekly for the first month then once weekly.
    Make allowances for any HEAVY rainfall.

How is a rose grown?

The Rose Company supplies both one and two year old plants to the Australian rose market. Both our one and two year old roses begin their growing life as rootstock. Rootstock becomes the foundation for grafted rose buds that are usually of a less hardy variety. Rootstock improves the health of the rose as rootstocks tend to be extremely vigorous in growing nature. This means plants perform better as they become more disease resistant and the characteristics of the rose tend to be accentuated, for example, more blooms or perfume.

Roses should be grafted onto the rootstock that is best suited for localised growing conditions. We have found that Dr Huey rootstock produces superior growing results as it has a longer budding season, it is easier to propagate and it adapts well to different soil types. Below we have tabled the growing cycle for both one and two year old roses.

One Year Old Plants

  • May – Cultivation and preparation of rootstock into canes
  • June – Planting of bush and standard rootstock canes
  • November – Budding commences, which involves grafting the required rose variety required onto the rootstock
  • January – Roses are topped to just above the graft. This removes the rootstock leaving the rose variety to grow
  • June - Rose are lifted from the ground packed and sent to retailers

Two Year Old Plants

  • May – Cultivation and preparation of rootstock into canes
  • June – Planting of bush and standard rootstock canes
  • November – Budding commences, which involves grafting the required rose variety required onto the rootstock
  • September - Roses are topped to just above the graft. This removes the rootstock leaving the rose variety to grow
  • March - Rose are lifted from the ground packed and sent to retailers